Accessible Free Twitter Games and Where to Find Them!

updated December 20, 2009.
Twitter is a free service that lets you keep in touch with people through the exchange of quick, frequent answers to one simple question: What's happening?
Qwitter for accessible Twitter.
The Qwitter client enables blind individuals to interface with the Twitter service globally, regardless of application focus.
Qwitter, with support for the three major comercial screen readers and sapi speech, provides you instant access to all aspects of the twitter microblogging service,
giving you the ability to post a tweet from anywhere, read tweets, perform searches, and more.

The new games start here!


140 Mafia.
A Twitter-based Mafia game, very similar to face book's famous mafia wars.
Start a mob family, recruit your friends, and rule Twitter!

TweetStones.
A classic thinking game, where you must remove the last stone to win.
Three piles of stones are laid down, and you and your Twitter adversary take turns removing them from the pile.
It's all done via direct messages, and the winner is posted to the TweetStones site.

BeatMyTweet.
Every half hour, a new word or phrase is posted to the BeatMyTweet Twitter account for you to unscramble.
Win points for being the first to unscramble the word or phrase, and perhaps see your name on the leaderboard.

twitBrain.
Answer math problems in your spare time.
What is 743 minus 70 plus 10 times 65
That was blazingly fast mister travis!
The answer was 98 and it took you 16 seconds!

Artwiculate.
A word of the day game for Twitter.
competition that helps clever people look clever and helps the rest of us learn new words.
To play, just use todayís word in context in one of your tweets.
Thatís it. Your tweet will appear here where people can tell you if they like it.
Youíll get points if they like it or retweet it.

Trivia on Twitter.
Q: Ludwig Van Beethoven was born December 16 1770.
How many symphonies did he compose in his lifetime?
Answer today's Prize Draw question and get up to two chances to win a prise.
web page by Louis Scrivani and Phil Vlasak, December 20, 2009